Is Condom Good for the Vagina?

In addition to preventing unplanned pregnancy, as well as prevent transmission of venereal disease infection, it turns out condoms also have a protective function against the vagina. In what way? A studies published in China state that condoms can trigger the development of “good” or “beneficial” bacteria (flora) in the vagina.

One study found that women who were sexually active and using condoms had more beneficial flora (bacteria) in the vagina than women using other types of contraception. The bacteria they studied were Lactobacillus.

Researchers from Beijing Friendship Hospital investigate Chinese married women between the ages of 18 and 45 who do not use hormonal contraceptives. Subject subjects, 72 women using condoms, 57 subjects using IUD (spiral) and 35 women using the latch method. The researchers focused on lactobacillus bacteria, a group of bacteria that normally reside in the vagina in most women.

These bacteria produce lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide, which helps maintain the acidity of the vagina. This acidity can prevent infection by “bad” bacteria. Sexual activity can also alter the ecosystem of the vagina where the sperm can alter the acidity of the vagina, which can also trigger the infection.

This study argues that condoms, can help to maintain the natural acidity of the vagina.

Maintaining the ecosystem in the body especially in the vagina can help the body in preventing the development of other bacteria that can prevent vaginal diseases.